A literary analysis of the revenge in the cask of amontillado

This means that to obtain the perfect revenge one has to execute their revenge with such perfection that they can successfully perform it without being caught.

A literary analysis of the revenge in the cask of amontillado

You can read the story here. The story is narrated by the murderer, Montresor, who takes revenge on a fellow Italian nobleman, Fortunato, during the carnival season.

When they arrive down in the catacombs, Montresor chains his drunken rival to the wall and then proceeds to wall him up inside the family vault, burying the man alive. Fortunato at first believes it to be a jest, but then realises that he has been left here to die.

Fifty years later, Montresor says that the body of Fortunato is still there in the vault. Why does Montresor want revenge on Fortunato? For Montresor has every reason to confide to us — via his close friend, the addressee of his narrative, who is our stand-in in the story — his reason for wishing to kill Fortunato.

But instead of getting a clear motive from him, we are instead given a series of possible reasons, none of which quite rings true. This is made clear in the opening words of the story: The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge.

You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled — but the very definitiveness with which it was resolved precluded the idea of risk.

A literary analysis of the revenge in the cask of amontillado

I must not only punish but punish with impunity. A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser.

A literary analysis of the revenge in the cask of amontillado

It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong. This provides a key clue to the motivation — shaky and vague as it is — of Montresor.

His revenge is not motivated primarily by any tangible harm that Fortunato has done him, so much as a sense of resentment, a way Fortunato has of making Montresor feel inferior. Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsbyput it: Another clue comes when Montresor fails to interpret a gesture made by Fortunato: He laughed and threw the bottle upwards with a gesticulation I did not understand.

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I looked at him in surprise. He repeated the movement — a grotesque one. Poe makes his point by some subterranean wordplay on mason:Jun 25,  · The Cask of Amontillado Question and Answer for your Assignments What is the meaning of the phrase “A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser”?

This means that to obtain the perfect revenge one has to execute their revenge with such perfection that they can successfully perform it without being caught. Free dramatic irony papers, essays, and research papers.

Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” is a story of revenge, but it’s more than just one man seeking justice against another. It is a representation of Poe’s personal life experiences with the upper-class as well as a symbol of the nobility versus the increasingly important lower classes.

SparkNotes: Poe’s Short Stories: “The Cask of Amontillado” ()

The macabre short story “The Cask of Amontillado” was published for the first time in , a fine example of Edgar Ellen Poe’s unique and biting writing style and sense of storytelling.

The Cask of Amontillado's Narrator "The Cask of Amontillado" uses a first-person narrator (a narrator that is a character in the story), and, sometimes, first-person narrators can be unreliable. An Analysis of Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” Commentary by Karen Bernardo.

As in “The Tell-Tale Heart,” the narrator of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” also fails to explain precisely why he is so intent upon revenge.

Literary Analysis of 'The Cask of Amontillado'